LEARNING

Learning at CISB

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

PRE SCHOOL

Preschool

This includes Early Childhood Education (aged 2 and 3 years), Junior Kindergarten (4 years), and Kindergarten (KG – 5 years). Preschool is the foundation for effective learning. Carefully chosen activity based topics nurture each child’s growth and development. Using manipulative materials, centers, blocks and sand and water, each child’s first experiences are both stimulating and fun. Some children only watch at first but soon choose to become engaged and involved. Our children experience an introduction to literacy and numeracy, songs and rhymes, story time, painting, crafts, and outdoor play.

Our KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM begins to emphasize both literacy and simple printing skills. The alphabet, numbers, simple words and sentences which forms the skill framework for our KG’s. Unit themes are introduced such as our community and our world.

 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Elementary School, Grade 1-5

This includes the concepts and skills of THE ONTARIO CANADA CURRICULUM Grades 1 to 8. The Primary Years of Grades 1 – 3 emphasizes skills are conceptually development for the both English language arts and mathematics. The Juniors of Grades 4, 5 and 6 extend these skills much further consolidating both literacy skills and number skills.

The Intermediates of Grades 7 and 8 are involved in further consolidation and application of these skills. Their studies involve more complex topics.

 

The areas of study are:

 

  1. English – reading, writing (composition), grammar, spelling, oral communications, and media literacy.
  2. Mathematics
  3. Science and Technology
  4. Health and Physical Education
  5. The Arts – Music, Visual Art, Dance, and Drama
  6. Social Studies, History, and Geography
  7. Foreign Language – French and/or Bangla (reading, writing, oral communication)
  8. Community Service

 

To assist in creating effective and exploratory learning opportunities for the students the school provides an Internet WiFi connection for high school students, an enriched Library Resource Centre as well as a Multi-Purpose room for activities such as music, dance, art and crafts.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Middle School, Grade 6-8

This includes the concepts and skills of THE ONTARIO CANADA CURRICULUM Grades 1 to 8. The Primary Years of Grades 1 – 3 emphasizes skills are conceptually development for the both English language arts and mathematics. The Juniors of Grades 4, 5 and 6 extend these skills much further consolidating both literacy skills and number skills.

The Intermediates of Grades 7 and 8 are involved in further consolidation and application of these skills. Their studies involve more complex topics.

 

The areas of study are:

 

  1. English – reading, writing (composition), grammar, spelling, oral communications, and media literacy.
  2. Mathematics
  3. Science and Technology
  4. Health and Physical Education
  5. The Arts – Music, Visual Art, Dance, and Drama
  6. Social Studies, History, and Geography
  7. Foreign Language – French and/or Bangla (reading, writing, oral communication)
  8. Community Service

To assist in creating effective and exploratory learning opportunities for the students the school provides an Internet WiFi connection for high school students, an enriched Library Resource Centre as well as a Multi-Purpose room for activities such as music, dance, art and crafts.

 

HIGH SCHOOL

High School, Grade 9-12

From Grade 9 to Grade 12, students earn course credits towards high school graduation. To obtain a Nova Scotia high school diploma, students must accumulate a minimum of 30 credits from a combination of compulsory and optional courses.

Nova Scotia works with school partners overseas to make Nova Scotia K-12 curriculum available to students in other countries. Affiliation agreements permit overseas schools to teach the Nova Scotia school curriculum. Grade-level affiliations vary, but all affiliated schools overseas employ teachers who hold a Nova Scotia professional teaching certificate. The intent of most of the agreements is to enable high school graduates to be eligible for a Nova Scotia high school diploma with the prospect of entry into post-secondary institutions in Manitoba or other provinces/territories of Canada.

The Canadian International School Bangladesh is a registered affiliated program.

Nova Scotia Affiliated Programs Overseas. School code 5024. 

 

HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS

High School Results

 

The Canadian International School Bangladesh  invigilates the Nova Scotia Education Provincial exams in English and Mathematics for grade 10 in January and in June of each year.  We have many grade 11 students and a couple of grade 10 students taking the Pre-Calculus 40S and Essential 40S exams.  This is exciting, as it allows students to free up some space in their grade 12 year for intense study in the sciences.

The ELA 40S exam reflects Nova Scotia’s outcomes-based English language arts curriculum. The test addresses the student learning outcomes that can be assessed through large-scale testing. Other student learning outcomes are also incorporated through processes associated with the test activities (e.g., group discussion, revising and editing). The test complements classroom-based assessment.

Achievement tests are developed by a committee. Each test development committee consists of an assessment consultant and a number of classroom teachers. The selection of teachers having varied experience in teaching is made in order to form a committee representative of the province: men and women from urban and rural regions, and teaching in the English, French Immersion, and Français programs. The role of the test development committee is to ensure that the achievement test is as congruent as possible with the curriculum within the parameters of large-scale testing. Using the curriculum, committee members design questions to assess as many outcomes as possible, and develop marking keys to go along with the test. Curriculum consultants (one from the Bureau de l’éducation française and one from the Instruction, Curriculum and Assessment Branch) are then invited to comment on the test content.

The tests are piloted in Manitoba prior to being sent by FEDEX to Bangladesh.

LANGUAGE AT CISB

The Canadian International School Bangladesh is an accredited English medium school in Dhaka.  The high school Nova Scotia Education charter allows students to write government exams in both English and French.  Bengali is taught until grade 9.  French is taught in all grades.

CISB has students from all around the world.  English is the language of instruction. Our multi-lingual students and staff speak over 10 languages.

Research has shown that there are many benefits to being able to speak more than one language. Learning multiple languages challenges the brain and improves cognitive and social-emotional development, learning, and the chances for long-term success.Sep 11, 2017 (https://www.google.com/search?q=how+multiple+languages+help+children&oq=how+multiple+languages+help+children&aqs=chrome..69i57.12870j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8)

 

ENRICHMENT CLUBS

Enrichment clubs

For students who may possess significant advanced learning levels – accommodation is made to provide extra challenges and opportunities.

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

English as an Additional Language

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

SPECIAL SUPPORT

Special Support

If a child is identified to be an ENGLISH SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) student or in need of SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES, there are separate criteria for admissions. For clarification please speak with our Principal to complete the application. The following documents are required:

1.     CISB Application Form – duly completed.
2.    Past 2 years school reports – as applicable.
3.    Birth Certificate and/or photocopies of Passport.
4.    CISB Health Form – duly completed by a doctor (GP)
5.    Recent photos of the student (5 passport size + 2 stamp size)
6.    Recent photos of both parents (2 passport size of each)
7.    Recent photo of each person authorized to pickup the child.

 

SPORTS

Sports

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

COMPETITIONS

Competitions

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

AFTER SCHOOL TRAINING

After School Training

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

ANNUAL SPORTS

Annual Sports

The Canadian International School Bangladesh is a proud member of DISA (Dhaka International School Association).  We compete with all of the top ranked international schools in Dhaka.

Children from EC to grade 12 participate in the following inter-school sporting events.  Students train during physical education classes.

Football

Basketball

Badminton

Track and Field

Volleyball

Cricket

Swimming

 

Each year the entire school has an exciting Sports Activity Day at the ISD field.  Students and staff compete in a variety of athletic and fun challenges.  

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS

After School Programs

At the Canadian International School Bangladesh it is our belief that when children are able to experience a well-rounded education – with opportunities to engage in a wide variety of both academic and non-academic experiences – they are being allowed the very best opportunities to develop holistically.

Our goal at CISB is to allow each one of our students to develop academically, socially, emotionally, and physically – allowing each child to grow and to become the very best that he or she can be.

One of the hallmarks of our Extra and Co-Curricular programs is the ASP – After School Program. This popular extra curricular series – takes place after school – and is run by the teachers using many of our facilities. ASP comprises a 6 weeks series of special-interest courses – designed to appeal to a variety of ages – and certainly both genders. This is offered during 2 of our 3 terms. Students may choose one or two or even three nights per week for the six weeks duration. The cost of per student is minimal and varies according to the materials required for the courses.

Examples of these 6 weeks courses are:

 

Soccer club Math club Embroidery
French club Handball club Hand stitching
Drama club Basketball club Fun food
Martial arts club Cricket club Clay work
Computer club Badminton club Glass painting
Chess club Arts club Papier mache
Dance club Reading club Roller skating
Spanish club Cooking club Library

 

VISUAL ARTS

Visual Arts

Opportunities for visual arts are provided at all grade levels – in many types of media. We employ a specialist Visual  Arts teacher for grades 1 to 8.

MUSIC

Music

Music in Bangladesh is a very important part of the culture. The Canadian International School Bangladesh has students performing at an exceptionally
 high level. The curricular music programme is supported and extended by the Activities program, available from Grade 2 to 12. The goal of the Activities program in music is to provide students with a path to pursue music at increasingly high levels, by enabling them to get involved at their individual ability level and giving them opportunities to perform.

DRAMA

Drama

Drama in the Activities program allows students to get involved in all
 aspects of theatre production, from performance to design and technical support.

Major productions at the school happen through the Activities program and are open to all students, whether or not they are involved in drama studies through the academic curriculum. There are a number of extracurricular dramatic opportunities for students in the elementary, Middle and High Schools—ranging from the large-scale classics to small-scale experimental work. There are numerous opportunities for interested students to obtain technical as well as dramatic expertise though participation in these events. Opportunities also exist for students to produce their own work—whether it is new writing or creative dance.

Regardless of the production or the size of their role, students benefit from performance opportunities that help them to develop confidence as well as presentation and communication skills that will serve them in whatever future path they choose.

 

DANCE

Dance

We provide opportunities for our students to engage in various styles of dance from traditional – to folk – to modern. We enjoy the services of a dance teacher on staff.

EDUCATIONAL TRIP

Educational Trip

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

 

DIGITAL EDUCATION

Digital Education

The Canadian International School Bangladesh embraces digital learning.  Digital learning is any type of learning that is accompanied by technology or by instructional practice that makes effective use of technology. It encompasses the application of a wide spectrum of practices including: blended and virtual learning.

Digital Learning is sometimes confused with online learning or e-learning, digital learning encompasses the aforementioned concepts.

A digital learning strategy may include any of or a combination of any of the following:

  • adaptive learning
  • badging and gamification
  • blended learning
  • classroom technologies
  • e-textbooks
  • learning analytics
  • learning objects
  • mobile learning e.g. Mobile Phones, Laptops, Computers, iPads.
  • personalized learning
  • online learning (or e-learning)
  • open educational resources (OERs)
  • technology-enhanced teaching and learning
  • virtual reality
  • augmented reality

Through the use of mobile technologies, digital learning can be used whilst travelling as mobile technologies gives us this advantage.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_learning)

STUDENTS DIGITAL CODE OF CONDUCT

Students’ Digital Code of Conduct

The widespread ownership of mobile phones among young people requires that school support staff, teachers, students and parents/carers take steps to ensure that mobile phones are used responsibly at schools. Mobile phones, digital music players and other personal electronic devices have become more widely available and, as a school, we must make a sensible and practical response. We understand that parents/caregivers wish their children to carry a mobile phone for their personal safety, while students may wish to bring additional devices to school for other reasons. The Canadian International School Bangladesh  accepts that personal mobile phones and tablets are often given to students by their parents/carers to ensure their safety and personal security.

1.Key roles and responsibilities

1.1.The administration has overall responsibility for the implementation of the personal electronic devices policy and procedures of CISB.

1.2.The administration has overall responsibility for ensuring that the Personal Electronic Devices Policy, as written, does not discriminate on any grounds, including but not limited to ethnicity/national origin, culture, religion, gender, disability or sexual orientation.

1.3.The administration has overall responsibility for reviewing the Personal Electronic Devices Policy annually.

1.4.The Principal and Middle School Coordinator has responsibility for handling complaints regarding this policy as outlined in the school’s Complaints Policy.

1.5.The Principal and Middle School Coordinator will be responsible for the day-to-day implementation and management of the personal electronic devices policy and procedures of CISB.

1.6.Parents/carers are asked to annually sign Appendix 4 to confirm they have read, understood and agree to this policy.

1.7.Students are asked to annually sign Appendix 4 to confirm they have read, understood and agree to this policy.

2.General property

2.1.Students are responsible for their own belongings and the school accepts no responsibility for replacing lost, stolen or damaged electronic devices.

2.2.Exercise books, text books, electronic equipment, stationary and folders issued by CISB remain the property of the school and should be treated as such.

2.3.Students are responsible for replacing lost or damaged school property, including electronic devices.

 

3.Personal electronic devices

3.1.Personal electronic devices include, but are not limited to, existing and emerging:

∙Mobile communication systems and smart technologies (mobile phones, iPhones, Smartphones, internet-enabled phones, etc.).

∙Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) (Palm organizers, pocket PCs, etc.)

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Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

∙Handheld entertainment systems (video games, CD players, compact DVD players, MP3 players, iPods, earphones, Bluetooth speakers etc.).

∙Portable internet devices (mobile messengers, iPads, etc.).

∙Smart watches.

∙Wireless handheld technologies or portable information technology systems (used for word processing, wireless internet access, image capture/recording, sound recording, and information transmitting/receiving/storing, etc.).

3.2.CISB School acknowledges the increasing use of mobile technology as part of the curriculum.

3.3.Parents/caregivers should be aware if their child takes a mobile phone or tablet to school.

3.4.CISB School accepts no responsibility for replacing lost, stolen or damaged mobile devices either at school, or travelling to and from school.

4.Acceptable use

4.1.Mobile devices shall be switched off and kept out of sight when they enter the school buildings and classrooms unless using the device as part of a lesson with the permission of their class teacher.

4.2.Students may use their personal devices/mobile phones when in the halls or canteen during break or lunch time.

4.3.Mobile phones should only be used for voice calls with the express permission of their parents/carers and teachers and for emergencies only.

4.4.Outside of the school buildings, students should use soundless features such as text messaging, answering services, call diversion and vibration alert to receive important calls.

4.5.Mobile devices should not be used in any manner or place that is disruptive to the normal routine of the school.

4.6.Students are responsible for protecting their own personal information including their phone number.

4.7.Students must keep their password/pin number confidential and not share these with anyone.

5.Unacceptable use

5.1.Unless express permission is granted, mobile devices should not be used to make calls, send SMS messages, iMessages or emails, take photos or use any other application during school lessons and other educational activities, unless permission has been given by a member of staff.

5.2.Electronic personal devices must not be used when inside the classrooms, except for the halls and canteen.

5.3.Files should not be sent between mobile devices and Bluetooth and WIFI functions should be disabled while on school premises unless being used in class for classroom activities.

5.4.If students fall ill during school hours, they must not use their mobile device to contact parents/caregivers; they should use the agreed procedures.

5.5.Students should not use their devices for contact with parents/caregivers during school hours. If there is an emergency students may use the telephone in the office or at the main school reception. Parents/caregivers may also relay messages to their child(ren) via office staff or the school reception who will ensure that messages are given to students.

5.6.Under no circumstances should mobile devices be taken into examinations.

5.7.Under no circumstances should mobile devices be used in changing rooms or toilets.

5.8.Personal laptops, mobile phones or tablets must not be plugged in to outlets on school premises without the express permission of the teacher.

5.9.Students may use a portable flash drive to transfer school work only.

5.10.Headphones must not be worn whilst inside buildings or classrooms during the school day, except in the canteen area and hallways at break or lunchtime.

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Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

5.11.Students must not video or take photographs of any other person while on the school site or taking part in a school related activity (on or off site).

5.12.Bluetooth speakers are not permitted for use in classrooms or on school property.

6.Cyberbullying

6.1.At CISB, cyber bullying is taken seriously.

6.2.Incidents of cyber bullying will be dealt with and reported along the same chain as the Anti- Bullying Policy.

6.3.As part of our on-going commitment to the prevention of cyber bullying, regular education and discussion about e-safety will take place each year.

7.Spot checks

7.1.Any teacher or staff member may ask any student to show them what they are doing on their mobile phone or tablet at any time.

7.2.Any teacher or staff member may ask any student to give them their portable flash drive at any time.

7.3.Students are required to comply with any request to check their mobile phone, tablet or flash drive.

7.4.Students are required to comply with any request to disable the screen lock function of their phone and show any teacher or staff member what they are doing.

8.Accessing Data

8.1.Downloading and accessing inappropriate websites and data on school or personal electronic devices is strictly prohibited.

8.2.Using the personal data of any student or member of staff for non-work related activity is strictly prohibited.

8.3.More information about accessing data can be found in our Data Protection Policy.

9.Sanctions

9.1.Any student caught breaking the Personal Electronic Devices Policy will have their electronic device confiscated until the end of the school day. This will be confiscated and taken to the school reception by a member of staff and it is the students’ responsibility to collect this at the end of the school day, after 3.15 p.m.

9.2.If an electronic device is confiscated more than once in the same term, then the electronic device will be confiscated and taken to the school reception by a member of staff and a member of the admin team will contact parents/caregivers to inform them that their child’s electronic device has been confiscated. Parents/caregivers and the admin team will agree when and how the electronic device will be returned to the student.

9.3.Any electronic device being collected from the school reception, by student or parent/caregiver, must be signed for acknowledging receipt of the device.

9.4.Students who refuse to give their electronic device to a member of staff when requests will result will have their parents contacted.

9.5.Bullying via any electronic device will be disciplined in line with CISB School’s Behaviour for Learning Policy.

9.6.Using a mobile device is a privilege which can be revoked at any time.

9.7.Confiscated mobile devices will be locked away securely at reception.

10.Exceptions

10.1.Exceptions may be permitted in special circumstances and only at a parent/caregivers request.

10.2.Requests should be made, in the first instance, to the Principal.

10.3.Exceptions will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

11.Policy review

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Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

11.1.This policy is reviewed annually by the Principal.

11.2.The scheduled review date for this policy is January 2020.

Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

Appendix 1 – Procedure for Confiscating Student Personal Electronic Devices Step 2

  • Member of staff confiscates an electronic device from a student. See ‘Section 4 Acceptable Use’ and ‘Section 5 Unacceptable Use’ of the Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy. 
  • Member of staff to take Electronic Device to the main school reception as soon as possible following confiscation and complete a ‘Confiscated Item’ slip, which are available at reception. See Appendix 2.
  • Admin Team to log on SIMs that an Electronic Device has been confiscated. See Appendix 3. 3
  • Admin Team to determine if this is the first instance an Electronic Device has been confiscated by using the SIMs log.p 4

Step 5

  • If first instance, student may collect device at the end of the school day, after 3.15pm.
  • If second instance in the same term, Admin Team to contact parents/caregiver to notify them and agree how the device is being returned.
  • When a student and/or parent/caregiver collects a confiscated Electronic Device from the school reception, they must sign to confirm receipt of this. Signed logs will be kept in the school reception.

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Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

Appendix 2 – ‘Confiscated Item’ Slip

When a member of staff confiscates a student’s Personal Electronic Device, they must complete the below slip which will be available the school reception.

Confiscated Item

Name:_______________________________ Date

Member of Staff:_________________________________

Reason: ______________________________________

For Admin Us (initial when complete)

Parent/caregiver contacted, if required

Is this the first confiscation for this

student?

Who is authorised to collect?

Receipt of Collection

Signature of Collector

Date

Once above slip is complete by member of staff, the slip must remain with the confiscated item until it is collected. All items must be signed for upon collection. Once confiscated item has been collected, slips should be filed in the ‘Confiscated Items’ folder in the main school reception cupboard.

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Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

Appendix 3 – Logging Confiscated Item on the student file

The Admin Team are responsible for ensuring that all confiscated items are recorded on the student’s file, on the same day that the item is confiscated.

Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

Appendix 4 – Student Personal Electronic Devices Policy

The below agreements are to be signed annually by students and parents/caregivers. Completed agreements should be recorded in the student’s file and a copy of the agreement being placed on the students file.

This Appendix should be detached from the policy, signed and returned to the school.

Student Personal Electronic Devices Agreement

2019/20

I understand that a personal electronic device is a privilege that may be taken away if I abuse it. I agree to abide by the policy and understand the consequences if I fail to do so. I understand that personal electronic devices must not be used inside the school except the hallways and canteen during break and lunchtime and I am not permitted to taking any photograph or video footage while on the school site or involved with a school activity unless permission has been given by a member of staff.

Student Name: ___________________________________ 

Student Signature: ____________________________________________ 

Date: ____________________

 

Parental Personal Electronic Devices Agreement

2018/19

I recognise that Howden School bears no responsibility for personal electronic devices lost, damaged or stolen on school property or on journeys to and from school. I agree to the terms of this policy and will discuss with my child(ren) the responsibility of owning a personal electronic device. I understand that a member of staff may confiscate devices used in an unacceptable manner or when not permitted, as detailed in this policy.

Parent/Carer Name: _______________________________________________

Parent/Carer Signature: ____________________________________________

Date: _________________

 

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Community Service

In developmentally appropriate ways, students explore concepts and develop their essential understandings in these subject areas through interdisciplinary units of study.
Each student is supported by a teaching team that includes their classroom teacher and teacher assistant. Specialist teachers deliver music, languages and PE. Coaches work with classroom teachers to support Literacy and Digital Literacy.

The learning activities of infant-aged children are interdisciplinary in nature, reflecting their experiences outside of school. While the Infant School learning is intentional and connects to our College curriculum, teachers adjust their plans on a regular basis to ensure students’ backgrounds, interests and learning needs are taken into account.

After CISB

After CISB

Every year, our graduates are accepted into their universities of choice and attend best-in-field institutions in the US, UK, Australia, Bangladesh and Canada. Last year graduates of the Canadian International School Bangladesh are currently enrolled at the University of Toronto, Simon Fraser University and Carleton University in Canada.  Around the world CISB is proud of its graduates attending Australian National University, University of West Virginia, University of Malaysia and New York University. And, of course, a high school diploma from a Canadian high school gains you entry into Dhaka’s North South University. Our current grade 12 students are conditionally accepted to the University of Toronto, University of Guelph, University of British Columbia, Bristol University in the UK and Concordia in Quebec.

Our comprehensive learning program means that our graduates are not just equipped for university but have the knowledge, skills and qualities necessary to excel in life. Some follow careers that fit very neatly with the CISB values, while others live out the values in unexpected ways in their chosen career.

While our alumni are all still engaged in their university studies we are noticing that they are exploring a wide variety of degree programs.  Engineering, business, law, the arts. In all walks of life, they have in common the shared experience of a CISB education, the knowledge that equips them to make a difference—and the desire to do so!

Known Location of CISB Alumni

 

LIBRARY

Library

The Canadian International School Bangladesh has a lovely library on the second floor that services Pre-K through grade 12.  If you think of a school library as a cozy, welcoming space where students can read quietly or browse through a rich collection of texts, you are only partially correct. The fact that school libraries are places for storage and quiet is only one small part of their purpose. They are, in the broadest sense, the backbone of learning activity. Much of what goes on each day draws from or occurs in or around the resources and space within the school library.  Here are the top 10 benefits of a school library:

1.A school library is meant to support the students in their studies.

2.Students can borrow books and take them home for further research.

 

3.Apart of text books, students often need reference books to prepare notes.

4.Reading helps the child to broaden his views over the subject. He starts to think in a new dimension altogether.

5.Since the environment at the school library is peaceful, students can study at the library without any disturbances. 

6.English as a second language learners need to be encouraged to read, read, read.

 

7.Other than academic books, the fiction and non fiction literature helps the child’s mental and emotional development.

8.The academic magazines and periodicals keep the student aware of the latest development around the world.

9.A library opens a world of wisdom for the student. A student can build his/her confidence by going through the books of his/her interest.

10.A school library promotes building a knowledge-driven community for the future.