CHILD SAFEGUARDING

CHILDREN ARE THE WORLD’S MOST VALUABLE RESOURCE & ITS BEST HOPE FOR THE FUTURE

Canadian International school Bangladesh affirms their commitment to the well being and safety of all members of the CISB community. CISB expects all individuals and groups affiliated with the school community, including staff, service and activity partners, volunteers, associated agencies, interns, contractors, guests, parents and visitors, to act with integrity and to take responsibility for keeping students safe. In keeping with this expectation, applicants for positions at the school must be willing to undergo background screening appropriate to the post, including checks with past employers. The Board believe in the right of all children to be protected from all forms of abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence.

Canadian International School Bangladesh strives to be a safe School in which every adult is:

Aware of the dangers of child abuse.

Committed to preventing harm to young people.

Able to respond and report any concerns regarding student safety and well being.

CHILD PROTECTION

child_protection_top_content

What is child abuse?

Child abuse is any action by another person – adult or child – that causes significant harm to a child. It can be physical, sexual or emotional, but can just as often be about a lack of love, care and attention. We know that neglect, whatever form it takes, can be just as damaging to a child as physical abuse.

An abused child will often experience more than one type of abuse, as well as other difficulties in their lives. It often happens over a period of time, rather than being a one-off event. And it can increasingly happen online.

The signs of child abuse aren’t always obvious, and a child might not tell anyone what’s happening to them. Children might be scared that the abuser will find out, and worried that the abuse will get worse. Or they might think that there’s no-one they can tell or that they won’t be believed. Sometimes, children don’t even realise that what’s happening is abuse. The effects of abuse may be short term or may last a long time – sometimes into adulthood. Adults who were abused as children may need advice and support.

SAFEGUARDING POLICY

CISB SAFEGUARDING POLICY

The CISB Board and the leadership teams, in keeping with our mission and values, believe that every child and young person, regardless of age, has at all times and in all situations a right to feel safe and protected, and we are committed to safeguarding and protecting students from harm.

In keeping with our mission and values, at CISB we expect our community to be honest and act with integrity; to be compassionate and morally responsible; and to help other people. We know that learners need a secure and supported environment in which to learn. We believe that every child and young person, regardless of age, has at all times and in all situations a right to be safe and protected.

At CISB, safeguarding policies and procedures encompass:

student wellbeing; bullying; harassment and discrimination; use of physical intervention / safe handling; meeting and advising the individual physical, psychological or medical needs of students; drug and substance misuse; relationships and sexuality education; online safety; as well as safe staff selection processes.

CISB expects all individuals and groups affiliated with the school community to act with integrity and to take responsibility for keeping students safe. This policy is binding for all who have contact with the school community, including staff, service and activity partners, volunteers, associated agencies, interns, contractors, guests, parents and visitors. In keeping with this expectation, applicants for positions at the CISB must be willing to undergo background screening appropriate to the post, including checks with past employers.

While the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child defines a child as persons under the age of 18 years, at CISB, we define child as any student of the school, or child visitor to the school. We recognise that some members of our school community are more vulnerable than others due to their personal circumstances.

Safeguarding is not just about protecting students from deliberate harm, it is linked to welfare and what we do for all children. Safeguarding involves the process of protecting children from abuse and neglect, preventing harm to children’s health or development, and ensuring children grow up with the provision of safe and effective care.

Child protection is part of the safeguarding process. It focuses on protecting individual children where there are concerns about abuse or neglect.

Child abuse is a serious and complex problem that may occur in the lives of children and young people. It is the term used to describe different types of maltreatment inflicted on a child or young person. Child Abuse includes non-accidental physical injury, neglect, sexual abuse and emotional or psychological abuse. In its most serious forms, abuse can lead to death or developmental harm to the physical or emotional well being of a child or young person.

❏ Physical Abuse – generally refers to the non-accidental use of physical force against a child, by an adult or where there is a power differential, that results in harm to the child.

❏ Physical force or punishment that results in bruising or injury would generally be considered physical abuse, even where there was no intent to harm.

❏ Physically abusive behaviours include, but are not limited to, shoving, hitting, slapping, shaking, throwing, punching, kicking, biting, burning, strangling and poisoning.

❏ Emotional / Psychological Abuse – refers to a parent or caregiver’s pattern of failure to provide a child with non-physical nurture, emotional support or availability.

Emotional abuse can take behavioural forms such as:

❏ Rejecting: the adult refuses to acknowledge the child’s worth and the legitimacy of the child’s needs;

❏ Isolating: the adult cuts the child off from normal social experiences, prevents the child from forming friendships, and makes the child believe that he or she is alone in the world;

❏ Terrorizing: the adult verbally assaults the child, creates a climate of fear, bullies and frightens the child, and makes the child believe that the world is hostile;

❏ Ignoring: the adult deprives the child of essential stimulation and responsiveness, stifling emotional growth and intellectual development;

❏ Corrupting: the adult stimulates the child to engage in destructive antisocial behaviour.

❏ Neglect – refers to the failure by a parent or caregiver to provide conditions that are culturally acceptable as being essential for a child’s physical or emotional development and well-being. Adult behaviours that are considered neglectful may include;

❏ Supervisory neglect: characterised by absence or inattention and can lead to physical harm or injury, sexual abuse or, in an older child, permitting criminal behaviour;

❏ Physical neglect: characterised by the caregiver’s failure to provide basic physical necessities, such as safe, clean and adequate clothing, housing, food and health care;

❏ Medical neglect: characterised by a caregiver’s failure to provide appropriate medical care. This could occur through a failure to acknowledge the seriousness of an illness or condition, or the deliberate withholding of appropriate care;

❏ Emotional neglect: characterised by a lack of caregiver warmth, nurturance, encouragement and support

❏ Educational neglect: characterised by a caregiver’s failure to provide an education and the tools required to participate in the education system;

❏ Abandonment: when a caregiver leaves a child alone for more than a reasonable period and does not provide for the presence of alternative age-appropriate care.

❏ Sexual Abuse – refers to the involvement of a child in sexual activity that he or she does not fully comprehend, is unable to give informed consent to, or that violates the laws or social taboos of society. It relates specifically where there is a power differential and the activity is intended to gratify or satisfy the needs of the older child or adult.

It may involve:

❏ Family members of the child: sexual activity between a child and an adult family member

❏ Adults in a position of power or authority: sexual behaviour between a child and an adult in a position of power or authority over them (e.g., a teacher)

❏ Adolescent or child perpetrators: Non-consensual sexual activity between minors (e.g., a 16-year-old and an 8-year-old), or any sexual behaviour between a child and another child or adolescent who – due to their age or stage of development – is in a position of power, trust or responsibility over the victim.

❏ Adults with no familial relationship to the child: sexual behaviour between a child under the age of consent and an adult.

❏ Online sexual abuse: includes grooming children online such as through instant messaging or accessing child exploitation material, and producing and distributing exploitation material even where there is no sexual interest in children.

REPORTING CONCERNS

If you have any concerns about the safety or well being of students at CISB, please speak with the Principal or a member of the administration. Or you can inform through email at:

childsafeguarding@canadaeducationbd.com
OR
info@canadaeducationbd.com